Archive for the ‘pinot noir’ Category

The wine regions of Germany

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Germany has 13 separate wine growing regions, each of which produces its own style of wine, often from the same varieties. Generally, the lightest and most elegant German wines are produced in the Mosel-Sarr-Ruwer and Ahr regions.
Slightly fuller wines are made inthe Mittelrhein, Nahe, Rheingau, Rheinhessen, Saale-Unstrut, while the fullest German wines tend to come from the regions of Pfalz, Hessische Bergstrasse, Sachsen, Württembery and Baden.

Wine regions Major wine types Soil type Wine style
Ahr Red/Rose:
Spätburgunder,
Portugieser
volcanic slate light, fruity
Mosel-Saar-Ruwer White: Riesling slate-covered slopes,
rich in minerals
elegant, delicate,
racy
Nahe White: Riesling, Müller-Thurgau, Silvaner loess, loam, quartzite, porphyry fruity, crisp, stylish
Pfalz White: Riesling,
Scheurebe, Gewürztraminer,Muller-Thurgau, Kerner, Silvaner
Red/Rose: Spätburgunder, Portugieser
loam, weathered limestone full, aromatic, round
Hessische
Bergstrasse
White: Riesling,
Müller-Thurgau
loess elegand, fruity,
good acidity
Baden White: Ruländer
(Pinot Gris), Müller-Thurgau,
Gewürztraminer, Riesling

Red/Rose:Spätburgunder
loess, loam, volcanic
soil
full, aromatic,
spicy
Sachsen White: Müller-Thurgau,
Weissburgunder, Gewürtraminer
variety of soil,
(sand, porphyry, loam)
dry, crisp, distinctive


Selected websites show other articles on: Germany wines.
This blog also has a post that gives an overview of the German red varieties and another with an overview of the German white varieties.

How to enjoy Champagne wines

Monday, November 26th, 2012

How should I store Champagne?

Champagne wines should be kept in a cool, dark place away from heat, light, vibrations and severe temperature variations. Unlike the best wines from Bordeaux or California, Champagne wines are ready for consumption when they are shipped to the market. However, some wine lovers also enjoy cellaring their Champagnes for a few extra years.

What is the best way to chill Champagne?

Before opening, chill the wine well, but do not freeze it. Champagne is best chilled by placing the bottle in a bucket filled with ice and water for 30-40 minutes or in the vegetable bin of the refrigerator for several hours.
Lovers of (French) Champagne always keep a bottle there for inspiration, unexpected guests and homey dinners.

How do I open a bottle of Champagne?

The pressure in a bottle of Champagne is equivalent to that of a tire of a double-decker bus, about ninety pounds per square inch. Slant the bottle at a 45 degree angle away from guests. Put a thumb on the cork, untwist and loosen the wire muzzle. Grasp the cork firmly, twist the bottle slowly and let the pressure help push out the cork. Allow a light and merry pop.

How should I serve Champagne?

Drinking Champagne by the bottleChampagne is best served in tall flute or tulip glasses, at a temperature of 42-47 degrees Fahrenheit. Tiny bubbles will rise in a continuous stream. When serving, pour a small quantity of wine into each glass and allow it to settle. Then fill each glass two-thirds full. Victorian saucer-shaped glasses are best kept for the service of sherbet or ice cream.

How much Champagne will I need?

For a Champagne apéritif at cocktail hour, allow one bottle for every three or four guests. When served at a meal, count on one bottle for every two or three people. And for the traditional Champagne toast to the bride, one bottle can serve six to ten people.

Related articles: the regions that produce Champagne and the red grapes that go into Champagne.

34 red wine varietals

Sunday, June 26th, 2011

Here is a list of vine varieties with a description of the red wines made from them.

Variety Origin Description
Aglianico Greek Tannic, tarry wines of great breed and lasting power from southern Italy.
Alicante French Hybrid.
Undistinguished grape with highly coloured juice, teinturier.
Baco
Noir
French Hybrid.
Full-bodied, deep colour, smoky blackberry flavour.
Barbera Italian Medium colour, high acid, dry quaffing wine.
Cabernet Franc French (Bouchet)
Usually blended with Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot. Medium-weight, herbaceous
wines suggestive of violets and raspberries.
Cabernet
Sauvignon
French Deep ruby colour, black currant and cedar nose, full-bodied, tannic when young.
Capable of long ageing. Softened with Merlot, Cabernet Franc in Bordeaux
and in California and Australia.
Carignan Spain Widely planted, high yielding. Astringent table wine with good colour, used for blending.
Cinsault French Hot weather grape, deep colour and meaty flavour, low tannins. Good for blending.
de
Chaunac
French Hybrid.
Acid, tough red, slightly smoky in flavour.
Dolcetto Italian Deep-coloured, soft, fruity wine, not for ageing.
Freisa Italian Garnet colour, light, dry wine tasting of raspberries.
Gamay French Grape of Beaujolais. Fresh, fruity, light-bodied wines tasting of cherry and plums with peppery finish. Fast maturing.
Gamay
Beaujolais
California Hybrid; a crossing between Valdiguié and Pinot Noir. Not very distinguished. Fruity flavour, high acid.
Grenache   (Garnacha/Cannonau)
Fruity, high alcohol, low tannins, soft. Good for rosé. Fast maturing.
Grignolino Italian Light
colour, fragrant strawberry aroma, very dry.
Kadarka Hungary (Gamza)
Powerful, deep, full-bodied wines.
Lambrusco Italy Light, grapey, fruity, off-dry wines.
Malbec French (Côt)
Early maturing, low acid, blackberry flavour. A lesser blending grape in Bordeaux.
Maréchal Foch French Hybrid.
Deep-coloured, peppery, plummy, acidic wine.
Merlot French Purple, full-bodied wines, blackberry flavour. Less tannic and earlier maturing than Cabernet Sauvignon. Ages very well.
Mourvèdre Spanish (Mataro)
Deep-coloured, powerful wines with a spicy blackberry taste.
Nebbiolo Italian (Spanna/Chiavennasca)
The noble grape of Piedmont producing long-lasting wines that take time to soften. Brick red, truffles and violets on the nose with an austere dry finish.
Petite Sirah French Californian name for the French Duriff. Full-bodied, deep-coloured wines with peppery flavour.
Pinot
Noir
French (Pinot Nero, Spätburgunder) One of the grapes of Champagne and the grape of red Burgundy. Difficult to cultivate. Garnet colour, barnyard bouquet,
raspberry flavour, medium weight. Ages very well.
Pinot
Meunier
French Secondary grape of Champagne. Fruity, acidic, low alcohol.
Pinotage S.Africa (Hermitage)
Pinot Noir Cinsault crossing. Robust, powerful red, inky nose. Fast maturing, ageing potential.
Primitivo Italy Massive black wines of high alcohol and intense fruit. Thought to be progenitor of the Californian Zinfandel.
Ruby Cabernet California A Carignan-Cabernet Sauvignon crossing. Deep-coloured, fruity wines but lacking the finesse and breeding of Cabernet Sauvignon.
Sangiovese Italian A Chianti grape usually blended with Canaiolo. Earthy, truffle-scented wines with fine acidity and ample tannins. Capable of long ageing.
Syrah Middle East (Shiraz)
Powerful black, aromatic wines tasting of blackberries and white pepper. Capable of long ageing.
Tempranillo Spanish (Ull de Llebre) Pinot Noir-like character. Pale ruby colour, coconut and sandalwood bouquet. Dry strawberry flavour. Ages elegantly.
Touriga Naçional Portugal The best port grape. Intense dark wine with high tannin and a lovely berry nose. Other port grapes include Mourisco, Tinta Francisca, Tinta Amarella,
Tinta Cao and Touriga Francesa.
Xynomavro Greek Black wines of high acidity and tannin that age well.
Zinfandel California Versatile grape that can produce powerhouse to medium-weight reds, rosés and blush wines. Characterized by a blackberry flavour and intense fruit. Also
late harvest with port-like sweetness.

On this website here is a list of white wine varietals.

The 3 major red varieties in Germany

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Here is an overview of the major German varieties of red grapes.

German red wines are refreshing, often light, and show more fruit than tannins.
They are a specialty and usually consumed after ageing in bottle.

Spätburgunder

Spätburgunder grapes(Pinot noir) is the riesling’s red counterpart (7% of the total vineyard area), producing elegant, distinctive wines. Its small grapes ripen late. It originally came from the French province of Burgundy.

Wine: velvety, full-bodied, with hints of almonds.

Portugieser

Portugieser grapesOriginally came from the Danube Valley in Austria (not Portugal). It ripens early (4%).

Wine: flavourful, light, mild; very pleasant, easy-going wine.

Trollinger

Trollinger grapesGrows almost exclusively in Württemberg (2%) and probably originated in Tyrol. It ripens very late.

Wine: fragrant, fresh, fruity, good acidity, hearty.

Related articles

As a complement you can read an overview of the white varietals in Germany or the article on the German wine regions.

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